5 Video Content Creation Rules I Stand By
5 min read

5 Video Content Creation Rules I Stand By

Video Marketing
Jun 22
/
5 min read

I’ve researched, scripted, recorded, and edited well over 3,000+ pieces of video content from Instagram stories to Reels to YouTube content. At this point, it’s like second nature. Today I have 5 practical video content creation tips I live by (some of which you might’ve not heard of before) that you can implement today

Dig in!

1. Outline your ideas and their execution before recording

Ever make a video and then realize it would’ve been soooo much better if you had thought of doing [insert thing you wish you’d done] before?

Before I make a video – even an Instagram story – there is always some degree of light to heavy planning (depending on the content format’s complexity).

Here’s what my process usually looks like for content like Reels or 1-minute+ long video clips:

  1. Research: Is there demand for this topic and can I bring my own unique perspective or take to it?
  2. Outline Ideas: how can I organize what needs to be said in a way where I lead with a good hook and retain viewership throughout?

    I like making bullet points on a sticky note (for Reels) and piece of paper (videos 1-minute or longer) to keep my video ideas structured but my speech still feeling natural since my actual words are not scripted.
  3. Map Out Audio, Effects, and B-Roll: Keep in mind, not every video will always have all three. Look at your outline and think what would enhance your video? Think of it in terms of how can an audio, effect, or shot of b-roll support your visual and auditory storytelling?

    For example, if I’m telling you I went through a depressing phase with imposter syndrome I could filter that part my video with a black and white effect, add sad music or even overlay footage looking out a rainy window.

    I’ll say it again but differently - these extra things are tools to help you better tell and emphasize key parts of your story. Don’t just add a fiery explosion into your video because you can.

    Add and remove things with a purpose in mind.
  4. Record: Shoot your video! I like to stick my outline in front of me for reference.
  5. Edit: Thanks to your planning and outline, you’ll find editing is much quicker when you mapped things out before hand.


P.S. For Instagram stories I simply think how can I lead with something strong in the most direct/concise/interesting way possible, what text I can add to enhance it, and a simple zoom-in/zoom-out for pattern interrupt which brings me to the next tip….


2. Use pattern interrupt to make even boring videos more fun

Confession time…I ALWAYS skip Instagram stories of people who blab on and on and on with no text or caption sticker over their video, no effects, nothing. Just them in the same unchanging camera frame.

But maybe what they’re saying isn’ actually boring. Their delivery and editing is what makes the content boring because it’s sooo monotonous.

So to break boring monotony you need…PATTERN INTERRUPT!

Pattern interrupt can be as simple as a subtle zoom in/zoom out to an animated text overlay with some fancy sound effect and filter. It’s something that breaks the pattern of whatever is going on.

And psychologically speaking, it fools our goldfish attention-spanned brains into thinking we’re consuming some fresh content by refocusing our attention with…oh heyyy look a shiny effect! lol you get it!

Nobody who doesn’t know you wants to see your screen share or see you talk for 15+ seconds with no change in the visuals or audio. OUCH…I knowww. But it’s a fact. You’re probably ruthless too with the split second decisions you make when skipping a story or video post on your feed. I see you 🤪

3. Before you create a high-production value video validate the idea with a low-production value post

Classic rookie mistake here.

I wasted so much time planning and prepping for IGTV’s and YouTube videos without gathering feedback before. I would think something is genius only for it to tank performance-wise.

Let’s think of content as a meal.


🥂 Drinks (Low Production Value)

These are your low production value formats like tweets, a single-image feed post on IG, a story, or a LinkedIn status update. They’re simple value-filled posts that are quick and easy to make.


🥗 Appetizers (Medium Production Value)

Instagram reels, carousels, 1-minute videos, twitter threads, longer LinkedIn text updates, etc - these are all examples of content that take a bit more effort to product.

If people got drunk on your drinks, give them an appetizer.


🥘 Main Course (High Production Value)

And lastly we have YouTube videos, video podcast content, IGTV’s, and even things like digital downloads count here. These are formats that take significantly more time and effort to plan, record, and edit. If people like your drinks and appetizers then give them the main course.


This is what will tell you what’s worth invest more time into. And this is also what will reveal additional questions people might have that your “main course” should include.

4. Talk like you speak (not like a corporate robot)

Pretend you’re talking to a friend, a close co-worker, or even leaving yourself a voice note. Not only does this alleviate the tension of what you feel you “should” sound like but it makes your content easier to understand.

The best content is the content that’s not only useful but easy to digest. Don’t bother trying to sound “professional” by using fancy words.

The more you do this the better you become.

5. Pause in between sentences and ideas for easier editing

Wonder how it seems people are able to talk for 3+ minutes in a video without getting tongue tied? It all seems like one perfect take but it’s not.


Here’s how to make it look like you never get tongue-tied on video:

  1. State one sentence or idea at a time.
  2. Take a pause before moving on to the next sentence or idea.
  3. Repeat steps 1-2 until your video is done.
  4. Load your video onto your video editor
  5. Look at the audio waves and cut out all the parts where there is a pause
  6. Now you have a smooth video that looks like you spoke for who knows how long without messing up. You’re welcome hahaha
  7. (Optional) Watch the video with the pauses still in there. It’s so awkward and always makes me laugh 😂

This is one of my favorite tips. It has made my editing and my content 10X better!

To be clear, there is no hack around time and practice. These tips are simple but don’t expect perfection from day 1. I promise you it will feel more natural and comfortable the more you do this daily or weekly.

Stop overcomplicating content.

Progression > Perfection.

Diana Briceño

Head of Content at VEED (1st marketing hire and 7th employee). Video content creation lover and passionate about all things content. Documenting my career lessons (and stupid jokes) every week.

5 Video Content Creation Rules I Stand By
5 min read

5 Video Content Creation Rules I Stand By

Video Marketing
Jun 22
/
5 min read

I’ve researched, scripted, recorded, and edited well over 3,000+ pieces of video content from Instagram stories to Reels to YouTube content. At this point, it’s like second nature. Today I have 5 practical video content creation tips I live by (some of which you might’ve not heard of before) that you can implement today

Dig in!

1. Outline your ideas and their execution before recording

Ever make a video and then realize it would’ve been soooo much better if you had thought of doing [insert thing you wish you’d done] before?

Before I make a video – even an Instagram story – there is always some degree of light to heavy planning (depending on the content format’s complexity).

Here’s what my process usually looks like for content like Reels or 1-minute+ long video clips:

  1. Research: Is there demand for this topic and can I bring my own unique perspective or take to it?
  2. Outline Ideas: how can I organize what needs to be said in a way where I lead with a good hook and retain viewership throughout?

    I like making bullet points on a sticky note (for Reels) and piece of paper (videos 1-minute or longer) to keep my video ideas structured but my speech still feeling natural since my actual words are not scripted.
  3. Map Out Audio, Effects, and B-Roll: Keep in mind, not every video will always have all three. Look at your outline and think what would enhance your video? Think of it in terms of how can an audio, effect, or shot of b-roll support your visual and auditory storytelling?

    For example, if I’m telling you I went through a depressing phase with imposter syndrome I could filter that part my video with a black and white effect, add sad music or even overlay footage looking out a rainy window.

    I’ll say it again but differently - these extra things are tools to help you better tell and emphasize key parts of your story. Don’t just add a fiery explosion into your video because you can.

    Add and remove things with a purpose in mind.
  4. Record: Shoot your video! I like to stick my outline in front of me for reference.
  5. Edit: Thanks to your planning and outline, you’ll find editing is much quicker when you mapped things out before hand.


P.S. For Instagram stories I simply think how can I lead with something strong in the most direct/concise/interesting way possible, what text I can add to enhance it, and a simple zoom-in/zoom-out for pattern interrupt which brings me to the next tip….


2. Use pattern interrupt to make even boring videos more fun

Confession time…I ALWAYS skip Instagram stories of people who blab on and on and on with no text or caption sticker over their video, no effects, nothing. Just them in the same unchanging camera frame.

But maybe what they’re saying isn’ actually boring. Their delivery and editing is what makes the content boring because it’s sooo monotonous.

So to break boring monotony you need…PATTERN INTERRUPT!

Pattern interrupt can be as simple as a subtle zoom in/zoom out to an animated text overlay with some fancy sound effect and filter. It’s something that breaks the pattern of whatever is going on.

And psychologically speaking, it fools our goldfish attention-spanned brains into thinking we’re consuming some fresh content by refocusing our attention with…oh heyyy look a shiny effect! lol you get it!

Nobody who doesn’t know you wants to see your screen share or see you talk for 15+ seconds with no change in the visuals or audio. OUCH…I knowww. But it’s a fact. You’re probably ruthless too with the split second decisions you make when skipping a story or video post on your feed. I see you 🤪

3. Before you create a high-production value video validate the idea with a low-production value post

Classic rookie mistake here.

I wasted so much time planning and prepping for IGTV’s and YouTube videos without gathering feedback before. I would think something is genius only for it to tank performance-wise.

Let’s think of content as a meal.


🥂 Drinks (Low Production Value)

These are your low production value formats like tweets, a single-image feed post on IG, a story, or a LinkedIn status update. They’re simple value-filled posts that are quick and easy to make.


🥗 Appetizers (Medium Production Value)

Instagram reels, carousels, 1-minute videos, twitter threads, longer LinkedIn text updates, etc - these are all examples of content that take a bit more effort to product.

If people got drunk on your drinks, give them an appetizer.


🥘 Main Course (High Production Value)

And lastly we have YouTube videos, video podcast content, IGTV’s, and even things like digital downloads count here. These are formats that take significantly more time and effort to plan, record, and edit. If people like your drinks and appetizers then give them the main course.


This is what will tell you what’s worth invest more time into. And this is also what will reveal additional questions people might have that your “main course” should include.

4. Talk like you speak (not like a corporate robot)

Pretend you’re talking to a friend, a close co-worker, or even leaving yourself a voice note. Not only does this alleviate the tension of what you feel you “should” sound like but it makes your content easier to understand.

The best content is the content that’s not only useful but easy to digest. Don’t bother trying to sound “professional” by using fancy words.

The more you do this the better you become.

5. Pause in between sentences and ideas for easier editing

Wonder how it seems people are able to talk for 3+ minutes in a video without getting tongue tied? It all seems like one perfect take but it’s not.


Here’s how to make it look like you never get tongue-tied on video:

  1. State one sentence or idea at a time.
  2. Take a pause before moving on to the next sentence or idea.
  3. Repeat steps 1-2 until your video is done.
  4. Load your video onto your video editor
  5. Look at the audio waves and cut out all the parts where there is a pause
  6. Now you have a smooth video that looks like you spoke for who knows how long without messing up. You’re welcome hahaha
  7. (Optional) Watch the video with the pauses still in there. It’s so awkward and always makes me laugh 😂

This is one of my favorite tips. It has made my editing and my content 10X better!

To be clear, there is no hack around time and practice. These tips are simple but don’t expect perfection from day 1. I promise you it will feel more natural and comfortable the more you do this daily or weekly.

Stop overcomplicating content.

Progression > Perfection.

Diana Briceño

Head of Content at VEED (1st marketing hire and 7th employee). Video content creation lover and passionate about all things content. Documenting my career lessons (and stupid jokes) every week.